Living your Values

Gratitude Can Help You Master The Art of Saying Thank You

By April 23, 2019 No Comments
Gratitude-Living-your-Values-Blog
Gratitude-Living-your-Values-Blog

Your most limited resource isn’t money, it’s time. None of us can get out time back, ever. Because of this – your attention – what you focus your thoughts on at work, is a serious currency for you, your business and the people you work with.

When we focus our thoughts on what is good about our people, the corresponding feeling of gratefulness we experience for their work and contribution is called Gratitude. The personal and professional benefits of cultivating gratitude are well established, but how does Gratitude help us at work?

Practically, we demonstrate our gratitude by saying thank you to others. Sounds simple right? Yes, it is so simple that we often forget to do it, and that matters because we have missed dozens of opportunities to acknowledge the people who are part of our success.

Your most limited resource isn’t money, it’s time. None of us can get out time back, ever. Because of this – your attention – what you focus your thoughts on at work, is a serious currency for you, your business and the people you work with.

When we focus our thoughts on what is good about our people, the corresponding feeling of gratefulness we experience for their work and contribution is called Gratitude. The personal and professional benefits of cultivating gratitude are well established, but how does Gratitude help us at work?

Practically, we demonstrate our gratitude by saying thank you to others. Sounds simple right? Yes, it is so simple that we often forget to do it, and that matters because we have missed dozens of opportunities to acknowledge the people who are part of our success.

Leaders who master the art of the thank you are loved, and benefit from highly engaged teams

So how can you master the art of the thank you?

Try having a running page or e-note where you jot down small things that people do during the week that you can thank them for. Things like:

  • Deb changed her own schedule to fit into mine
  • Deb offered a suggestion in the meeting that helped us move forward
  • Deb did some extra last-minute work that got a client over the line

Set aside 20 minutes each week to text/call/email people who have helped you in some way that week. We recommend Friday afternoon for this – it finishes the week on a high for everyone.

Done simply, your text message reads something like “Hey Deb, just wanted to say that your comment in Tuesday’s meeting was a game-changer and helped the team see the issue differently. Thank you!”

In our workshops, leaders will often comment that they don’t want to thank people for doing their job or showing up to work. I agree we don’t say thanks for coming to the meeting – that is expected. We acknowledge the contribution because that’s where high performance lies.

Gratitude doesn’t have to be something for the weekend. Thank you is gratitude@work in your workplace, and it helps to build a culture of acknowledgement and recognition.

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